Athletics News

Here’s everything you missed from the Millrose Games: The Women by Oliver Hinson, For RunBlogRun 

Here’s everything you missed from the Millrose Games: The Women by Oliver Hinson, For RunBlogRun 

This is Oliver Hinson’s second feature on the 116th Millrose Games. Oliver wrote his first piece on the Men’s Millrose Games events. I enjoy Oliver’s relaxed style and his keen observation skills. Oliver, Jeff Benjamin and Elliott Denman were at Millrose to cover the event for RunBlogRun. Great job, Oliver! 

Here’s everything you missed from the Millrose Games: The Women

by Oliver Hinson, For RunBlogRun 

 

Clarity wins in journalism, so I’ll summarize today’s action in one word: fireworks. Naturally, when you put hundreds of the world’s best athletes in the same small building with 5,000 die-hard fans, things can get pretty raucous. 

 

The 2024 edition may have been one of the loudest and busiest, though. Two world records fell, as well as several national and facility records. If you didn’t make the trip up to New York, here’s what you missed from the day’s track action.

 

Women’s 60-meter hurdles

 

If anyone who bought a ticket was on the fence about whether it was money well spent, this race should have eliminated all doubts. Puma’s Devynne Charleton convincingly won and broke the world record, running 7.67. 

 

“Just based on numbers that we were putting up in practice, I knew that I was capable [of breaking 7.7] as long as I put the race together,” Charleton said.

Devynne Charlton takes 60m hurdles WR, 116th Millrose Games
The Armory, New York, NY, USA, by Kevin Morris

Charleton was already .07 seconds ahead of everyone else by the third hurdle, and by the end, she nearly doubled her lead – no one else crossed until 7.79.  After the race, she heard an announcer say something that might have sounded like “world record,” but she didn’t know for sure until she saw the number on the board. 

 

“I can’t describe that moment,” Charleton said.

 

It also meant a lot to Charleton that she represented her country, the Bahamas, in such an impressive way.

Devynne Charlton wins 60m hurdles in WR, photo by Kevin Morris for Millrose Games

“I always get so much support from the Bahaman community,” Charleton said. “I know they’re tuned in whenever I compete, and it means so much. We’re a small country, so to be one of the ones literally on top of the world, it’s an amazing feeling.”

 

Danielle Williams, Tia Jones, and Ackera Nugent were all in a close battle for second place, and they finished in that order. Williams beat Jones by two-thousandths of a second – 7.784 to 7.786 – while Nugent ran 7.80. World champion…

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